Posts Tagged Prosecco


To Be Or Not To Be Prosecco


The glass of wine in my hand doesn’t smell particularly fruity. Or blossomy. What I am picking up is more dried grass and lemon peel.

I take a sip. Yes, hay, some herbs maybe, raw hazelnuts, lemon peel and fresh bread. It feels dry, rounded but restrained.

Not what I’d expect from a glass of Prosecco.

Yet, according to producer, Primo Franco – of Nino Franco – this is exactly what his Grave di Stecca Brut 2009 is. (more…)

Share & Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • RSS

Anything But Champagne


I love Champagne. Don’t get me wrong. Just not ALL Champagne. Just not all the time.

For me, any brand emotion is quickly negated when I sip another glass of indifferent acid with bubbles like ball bearings because “it was on offer”.

Give me a glass of interesting, anytime. You can choose from the list below… (more…)

Share & Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • RSS

Friends With Benefits


So, after my recent review of  a 1 Lombard Street Wine Society dinner, a friend emails me with this:

“Just to remind you I have a case (magnums) of the 2004 Ch. Leoville Barton.

When are you coming?”

Twelve days later as it happened. (more…)

Share & Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • RSS

Wine Review: Catholic Tastes


Easter 2011. Already it seems such a long time ago – those lovely memories of a long, gloriously sunny afternoon where we could laze outside and sip wine all afternoon. (more…)

Share & Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • RSS

Getting Down With The Wine ABVs


Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, it wasn’t unusual to find wines with ABVs (alcohol by volume) of around 11%. Maybe 11.5%.  At least it wasn’t unusual on our dinner table when I was growing up in the 70s. With an Italian father, there was always wine with a meal, and always from Europe. But then the world got hotter. Viticulture and vinification improved. New World wines began flooding the Northern European market. And we started developing a taste for fruity, more powerful wines with ABVs of 13%, 14%, 15% and beyond. (more…)

Share & Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • RSS